Playing With Hurricanes For Over Six Decades

 As the conference details below from the “29th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology”   held in May 2010 show, weather modification technology related to hurricanes is in full swing, supported by a team of researchers, and aerosols or chemtrails are used in this work.

Work to modify hurricanes actually began over 6 decades ago.   In October 1947, GE announced that Project Cirrus would be intercepting a hurricane, not to “bust” it, but to experiment on the effects of seeding  a portion of the storm with dry ice, [1].   On October 13th, the Project Cirrus team, led by navy lieutenant commander Daniel Rex and Schaefer, bombed the heart of the storm with 80 pounds of dry ice and dropped 100 pounds into two embedded convective towers, [1]. It was reported in the press as “history’s first assault by man on a tropical storm,” and the official results were classified as military secrets.  Fixing The Sky (2010) by historian, Professor James Fleming states that the official report claimed a pronounced modification of the cloud deck that had been seeded.   What happened after that “nobody knows” since the hurricane made a “hairpin” turn and headed west, smashing into the coast along the Georgia-South Carolina border near Savannah.   Reports Fleming, a letter in a St Petersburg newspaper from JM Enders and addressed to GE research director Suits placed the blame for the devastation on “the weather tinkers of your lab” and pointed out that the people of Savannah were not so sure it was a coincidence.  In fact, they were “pretty sore at the army and navy for fooling about with the hurricane,” [2].

29th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

Session 2C

Hurricane Aerosol and Microphysics Program (HAMP)
Chair: William R. Cotton, Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
10:15 AM 2C.1 The Hurricane Aerosol and Microphysics Program (HAMP): A HAMP Contribution   wrf recordingRecorded presentation
Joe Golden, Golden Research & Consulting, Boulder, CO; and W. L. Woodley
10:30 AM 2C.2 Simulation of a landfalling hurricane using spectral bin microphysical model: effects of aerosols on hurricane intensity (the HAMP contribution)  extended abstract wrf recordingRecorded presentation
Alexander P. Khain, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel; and B. Lynn and J. Dudhia
10:45 AM 2C.3 Effects of aerosols on the Tropical Cyclone genesis as seen from simulations using spectral bin microphysics model (the HAMP contribution)  extended abstract wrf recordingRecorded presentation
Barry Lynn, Weather It Is, LTD, Efrat, Israel; and A. P. Khain
11:00 AM 2C.4 Spray microphysics and effects on surface fluxes as seen from simulations using a Lagrangian model with spectral bin microphysics  extended abstract wrf recordingRecorded presentation
Jacob Shpund, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
11:15 AM 2C.5 Can aerosols explain hurricane prediction errors?
Michal Clavner, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel; and D. Rosenfeld
11:30 AM 2C.6 Mechanisms of lightning formation in deep maritime clouds and hurricanes (The HAMP contribution)  extended abstract wrf recordingRecorded presentation
Nir Benmoshe, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel; and A. Khain, A. Pokrovsky, and V. Phillips
11:45 AM 2C.7 Feasibility study of the modification of the intensity of tropical cyclones by seeding CCN with an aircraft : A HAMP Project   wrf recordingRecorded presentation
Gustavo G. Carrio, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; and W. R. Cotton

Monday, 10 May 2010: 10:15 AM-12:00 PM, Arizona Ballroom 10-12

* – Indicates paper has been withdrawn from meeting

Browse or search the entire meeting

References:

1. Fixing The Sky (2010) by historian, Professor James Fleming.  Columbia Unversity Press. Page 151.

2. As above. Page 152.

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